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Terrifying Images Emerge From Within Once-Peaceful-Now-A-Security-Threat Nation Of Canada

WARNING: The following article contains images of people generally enjoying life and not bothering anyone. They cannot be unseen.

In the wake of Donald Trump’s declaration that Canada represents a security threat, and then using that declassified intelligence as justification to tariff the northern nation back to a safe status, images are beginning to emerge from the peace-torn population. They paint a horrifying picture of a depravedly-genial country in which many people live their entire lives without holding a loaded gun, or threatening to use such, and where speaking out against the nation’s overbearing rulers can get you a witheringly polite defense of your right to debate in a townhall meeting. Yes. It is stomach turning. Again, the images below are not for the dark of heart.

giphy
Warring Canadian factions, seen here performing the dreaded seat-dance shortly before sharing some form of a snack. Note that even their respective tribes (the Leafs and the Senators) are tied, in what international observers believe to have been a gruesome attempt to allow each other to both get a point.

High Park Castle

Photo credit: Greening Homes, http://www.greeninghomes.com

Unpaid workers (they call them VOLUNTEERS) working to rebuild a children’s park in Toronto after the original structure burnt down. One wonders why they bother, knowing it will probably only last thirty years and echo with the shouts of hundreds of thousands of children living generally comfortable lives. It’s unlikely any of these men are still standing. As it’s Friday night and the patios are open.

Trudeau

Photo credit: THE CANADIAN PRESS/John Woods

The Prime Minister, wearing plaid. In front of children. What sort of people allow this?

bc-referendum-rally

Photo credit: THE CANADIAN PRESS

The country nearly split in two in 1995, but after people got in buses and drove for thousands of kilometers (which are a dangerous type of miles) and told the people that wanted to leave that it would be so nice if they didn’t, those people voted in an orderly fashion to stay. Like some sort of experiment in democracy gone horribly, horribly right.

tim-hortons-coffee

Photo credit: CBC

They all pretend to like the same shitty coffee, because it would be rude not to.
(Though its popularity has gone down recently. No, not because it sucks, they don’t mind that. Because the company that makes the coffee isn’t paying their employees enough. Researchers are still sifting through the socialist wreckage in an attempt to understand why they care.)

Canadians also live in abject squalor.

Disgusting.

And there you have it. Horrible, dystopian, dehumanizing, Canada. How long will the world stand aside as this country spirals further and further away from winning a Stanley Cup? When will the United Nations intercede, and draw an end to the madness of people receiving health care without losing their homes, and marrying whomever they feel like? Only time will tell. For now we can only hope that Trump will be able to successfully tax the Canadians back into some form of civility. But, as their own iconic musician; the late, great, Gord Downie, once sang:

“Twelve men broke loose in seventy three
From Millhaven Maximum Security
Twelve pictures lined up across the front page
Seems the Mounties had a summertime war to wage.”

Whatever that means. Canadians can be really cryptic.
#PrayForSecurityThreatCanada


For more satire from the Canadian front lines, follow  The Out And Abouter on Facebook, or @OutAndAbouter on Twitter.
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281 replies »

            • Figurehead Head of State…..think of it as a toothless oligarch. Sorta like Donald Trump, minus the twitter account and boundless narcissism.

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            • So yes we do have a Monarch in Canada. As we where originally a territory of the British Empire, however; they have been nothing but a figure head since the 1960’s when Canada became and the Royal Family signed an agreement that the Royal Family had no political power in Canada and that the Royal Family was merely to remain as a symbol of our heritage and our membership of the British Commonwealth. Canada actually holds the right to appoint whoever they would like after Queen Elizabeth dies because there is a Crown for Canada (she just currently holds that among many other honorary titles from Queen to Mistress) and Canada not the Royal Family can appoint the next King/Queen to hold the crown (if we make no protest or motion when the next member of the Windsor family takes the Crown they will just get ours as well since it holds no power). We still have a Governor General which technically represents the Queen, again however; the Royal Family has no control over this position as of the 1960’s and they are elected to their position through political process. Most of their power is ceremonial (giving awards, making public appearances, etc) they do hold the ultimate power over the senate; should the senate become dead locked the Prime Minster can request the Governor General take action from voting to break the dead lock to dissolving the senate to create a vote to reappoint all seats in the senate. In theory the Gov Gen is meant to be a neutral political figure; they do not have any party affiliation they speak to what is best for the Country based on our Charter of Rights (obviously it’s impossible to be totally neutral) but I don’t even remember the last time any gov gen actually took any major action. They where asked during Harper’s years as PM but the Gov Gen at the time refused to grant his appeal to dissolve the senate and gave a dead line they had to settle the dead lock instead which actually worked against the PM trying to pass some crazy shit.

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              • She still has powers in Canada, but not like those she has in the UK. While the Canada Act 1982 received royal assent on March 29, 1982 in London, it was not until the Queen visited Canada the following month that the Constitution Act, 1982, its Canadian equivalent, was proclaimed by letters patent as a statutory instrument by the Queen during her presence in Canada. Canada’s Constitution Act, 1982 was signed into law by Elizabeth II as Queen of Canada on April 17, 1982 on Parliament Hill in Ottawa. Queen Elizabeth’s constitutional powers over Canada were not affected by the Act, and she remains Queen and Head of State of Canada. Canada has complete sovereignty as an independent country, however, and the Queen’s role as monarch of Canada is separate from her role as the British monarch or the monarch of any of the other Commonwealth realms. In 1953 the Canadian Parliament passed a Royal Style and Titles Act which gives the Queen her official title in Canada: “Elizabeth the Second, by the Grace of God, of the United Kingdom, Canada, and Her Other Realms and Territories, Queen, Head of the Commonwealth, Defender of the Faith”. K.C. Wheare has underlined how much the Canadian government at the time stressed the British element of the Crown.

                In the debate on this Bill, Prime Minister St. Laurent told the House: Her Majesty is now Queen of Canada but she is the Queen of Canada because she is Queen of the United Kingdom… It is not a separate office …it is the sovereign who is recognised as the sovereign of the United Kingdom who is our Sovereign…[82]

                The agreement of the Commonwealth Heads of Government in 1952 has effectively ended the previous convention that any changes in the Royal Style and Titles should only be made with the assent of all Commonwealth countries who retain the Queen as Head of State. Indeed the Australian Parliament changed the formulation in 1973 from one similar to Canada’s to simply “Elizabeth the Second, Queen of Australia and Her Other Realms and Territories, Head of the Commonwealth”. It does not seem that a Canadian Parliament could now amend the Canadian title to something like the Australian one. The Canadian title clearly emphasises that the Canadian sovereign is one and the same as the British monarch, whereas the Australians deliberately eliminated this connection. Now that the office of the Queen is protected by the amending provisions of the 1982 Constitution Act, such an alteration in the royal title would appear to require the unanimous approval of all the provincial legislatures as well; the elimination of the clear connection with Britain seems to be a significant change in the office of the Canadian monarch and not just a simple change in title.

                I could go on, but I just ask, To which Act are you getting your information from?

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          • Who Governs Canada? Constitutionally, Canada’s head of state is Queen Elizabeth II. She is represented by a governor general at the federal level and by 10 lieutenant governors, one per province. The three territories each have a commissioner representing the Queen.Nov 9, 2015

            The sovereign is the personification of the Canadian state and is Queen of Canada as a matter of constitutional law. The current Canadian monarch is Queen Elizabeth II, who has reigned since 6 February 1952. Elizabeth’s eldest son, Prince Charles, is heir apparent.

            Liked by 2 people

            • People forget that the Queen has the ability to “fire” the governor-general” the governor generals job is to represent the Queen and ensure the governor doesn’t abuse his powers. There is so much the Queen does that no one realizes.

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              • But that may be about all she can do now…a lot changed since the Canada Act of 1982
                “In contrast to the head of state in a presidential system like the U.S., the Queen of Canada is considered the personification of the state rather than having an active political role. Technically speaking, the Queen doesn’t “do” as much as she serves a symbolic purpose, remaining neutral on political matters. As outlined by the Canadian Constitution, the governor general (working on behalf of the Queen) has a variety of important responsibilities from signing all bills into law to calling elections to inaugurating the elected prime minister and his or her cabinet. In reality, the governor general performs these duties symbolically as he generally gives his or her royal assent to every law, appointment, and proposal of the prime minister.

                The Canadian head of state does, however, hold constitutional powers known as emergency “reserve powers,” which separate the head of state and the head of government to ensure the proper functioning of Canada’s parliamentary government. In practice, these powers are very rarely exercised.
                While ministers, legislators, police, public servants and members of the armed forces, swear allegiance to the Queen, she doesn’t directly govern them.”

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          • Queen Elizabeth II is the Queen of Canada and is referred to as such when she’s in the country. She is also our head of state while the Prime Minister is the head of government. It’s a constitutional monarchy, where the monarch doesn’t wield any real power. Theoretically, she could refuse to sign laws when they go to her after third reading in Parliament, but practically, that won’t happen.

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              • Technically, yes. But in Canada it usually falls to the Governor General to enact…she can then consult the Queen for advice or approval.

                Canada
                In Canada, the royal prerogative is, for the most part, the same as that in the United Kingdom, as constrained by constitutional convention, although its exercise is usually through the federal governor general or the lieutenant governors of the provinces in their respective privy councils. The royal prerogative in Canada is largely set out in Part III of the Constitution Act, 1867, particularly section 9.
                As foreign affairs are a matter of royal prerogative, the power to declare war and deploy the armed forces belongs to the Crown, though only in its federal Cabinet (the federal government), as outlined in sections 9 and 15 of the Constitution Act, 1867. Neither legislation nor any other type of parliamentary approval, beyond budgetary matters, is required for such actions, though the Cabinet has on occasion consulted parliament before engaging Canada or extending Canada’s involvement in a conflict. Additionally, the federal and provincial crowns may ratify treaties, though only so far as they fall within the proper area of jurisdiction, according to sections 91 and 92 of the Constitution Act, 1867. Again, the endorsement of parliament is not necessary for these agreements to have force in an international sense, but the legislatures must pass treaties in order for them to have domestic effect. Proposed treaties have also occasionally been presented to parliament for debate before ratification. Members of Parliament have tabled bills seeking to curtail the use of the royal prerogative in foreign affairs by legislating a greater role for parliament, as have Senate standing committees, from time to time, called for the same.
                The issuance of passports also remains within the royal prerogative in Canada. The terms for the issuing of passports by the Minister of Foreign Affairs on behalf of the Crown are set out in the Canadian Passport Order, issued by the Governor General-in-Council. The Canadian government has used the royal prerogative on two occasions to deny a passport to a Canadian citizen, Abdurahman Khadr and Fateh Kamel. Lawsuits filed at the Federal Court, Federal Court of Appeal, and ultimately the Supreme Court of Canada did not find in favour of either Khadr, nor Kamel.
                The royal prerogative in Canada extends also to the granting of honours, as explained by the Court of Appeal for Ontario in Black v. Chrétien (regarding Conrad Black’s entitlement to an appointment to the House of Lords while a Canadian citizen). Other royal prerogatives, such as the prerogative of mercy, also exist in the Canadian context. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_prerogative

                In the other Commonwealth realms, the royal prerogative can be or is specifically mandated to be exercised by the monarch’s representative, the governor-general. The constitution of a Commonwealth realm may sharply limit the prerogative and many governmental acts which would be done under the prerogative in other countries are given effect by the constitution or Acts of Parliament in the Commonwealth realm.

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              • No, the Governor General of Canada now does that.

                Royal assent or sanction is the method by which a country’s monarch (possibly through a delegated official) formally approves an act of that nation’s parliament. In certain nations, such assent makes the act law (promulgation) while in other nations assent is distinct from promulgation. In the vast majority of contemporary monarchies, this act is considered to be little more than a formality; even in those nations which still permit their monarchs to withhold royal assent (such as the United Kingdom, Norway, and Liechtenstein), the monarch almost never does so, save in a dire political emergency or upon the advice of their government. While the power to withhold royal assent was once exercised often in European monarchies, it is exceedingly rare in the modern, democratic political atmosphere that has developed there since the 18th century.
                Royal assent is sometimes associated with elaborate ceremonies. In the United Kingdom, for instance, the sovereign may appear personally in the House of Lords or may appoint Lords Commissioners, who announce that royal assent has been granted at a ceremony held at the Palace of Westminster for this purpose. However, royal assent is usually granted less ceremonially by letters patent. In other nations, such as Australia, the governor-general merely signs the bill.
                **In Canada, the governor general may give assent either in person at a ceremony held in the Senate or by a written declaration notifying parliament of his or her agreement to the bill.**

                In Canada, the traditional ceremony for granting assent in parliament was regularly used until the 21st century, long after it had been discontinued in the United Kingdom and other Commonwealth realms. One result, conceived as part of a string of acts intended to demonstrate Canada’s status as an independent realm, was that King George VI personally assented to nine bills of the Canadian parliament during his 1939 tour of Canada—85 years after his great-grandmother, Queen Victoria, had last granted royal assent personally in the United Kingdom. Under the Royal Assent Act 2002, however, the alternative practice of granting assent in writing, with each house being notified separately (the Speaker of the Senate or a representative reads to the senators the letters from the governor general regarding the written declaration of Royal Assent]), was brought into force. As the act also provides, royal assent is to be signified—by the governor general, or, more often, by a deputy, usually a Justice of the Supreme Court, at least twice each calendar year: for the first appropriation measure and for at least one other act, usually the first non-appropriation measure passed. However, the act provides that a grant of royal assent is not rendered invalid by a failure to employ the traditional ceremony where required.
                The Royal Assent ceremony takes place in the Senate, as the sovereign is traditionally barred from the House of Commons. On the day of the event, the Speaker of the Senate will read to the chamber a notice from the secretary to the governor general indicating when the viceroy or a deputy thereof will arrive. The Senate thereafter cannot adjourn until after the ceremony. The speaker moves to sit beside the throne, the Mace Bearer, with mace in hand, stands adjacent to him or her, and the governor general enters to take the speaker’s chair. The Usher of the Black Rod is then commanded by the speaker to summon the members of parliament, who follow Black Rod back to the Senate, the Sergeant-at-Arms carrying the mace of the House of Commons. In the Senate, those from the commons stand behind the bar, while Black Rod proceeds to stand next to the governor general, who then nods his or her head to signify Royal Assent to the presented bills (which do not include appropriations bills). Once the list of bills is complete, the Clerk of the Senate states: “in Her Majesty’s name, His [or Her] Excellency the Governor General [or the deputy] doth assent to these bills.” If there are any appropriation bills to receive Royal Assent, the Speaker of the House of Commons will read their titles and the Senate clerk repeats them to the governor general, who nods his or her head to communicate Royal Assent. When these bills have all been assented to, the Clerk of the Senate recites “in Her Majesty’s name, His [or Her] Excellency the Governor General [or the deputy] thanks her loyal subjects, accepts their benevolence and assents to these bills.” The governor general or his or her deputy then depart parliament.

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          • Our head of state is Queen Eleizabeth II, and her representative in Canada is the Governor General. When the Prime Minister wishes to prorogue or dissolve Parliament, he must ask for permission from the GG.

            Liked by 1 person

          • “No we have a Prime Minister, we don’t have a queen”

            It is true that we have a prime minister. But we also have a queen. Please look at our money.

            Liked by 2 people

          • The Queen is the Head of State for Canada. That’s why her picture is on our money and all legal discourse is: by the order of the crown, the crown verse. Etc We are a member country of the British Commonwealth.

            Liked by 1 person

          • Our Prime Minister is the leader of our government but the Queen is still his boss
            It is the Governor General that has to open and close parliament as the Queen’s representative
            I am Canadian and I paid attention in school

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            • Actually, the Governor General is the PM’s boss. The PM is Head of Government …and he has two bosses over him. The Queen is the Head of State, she is the Governor General’s boss and she can approve or disapprove the appointment of the Governor General recommended by the Prime Minister, up to and as recently as 2012. The head of state in Canada is the sovereign or Queen of Canada, currently, Queen Elizabeth II. Before her, the Canadian head of state was her father, King George VI. The Queen’s powers as head of state are exercised by the Governor General of Canada except when the Queen is in Canada. The governor general, like the sovereign or Queen, remains outside of politics as the role of head of state in Canada is largely ceremonial.

              Governors general and lieutenant governors are considered representatives of, and therefore subordinate to, the head of state as opposed to the head of government, or the Canadian prime minister.

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          • Darlin’ you need a civics lesson. Officially, the Queen is our head of state. Same with Australia. Practically, the Governor General acts for her. There is an explanation for this, it has to to with the balance of power. Just in case we were crazy enough to vote in someone like the current Merican Pres we have a way out.

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          • Janie, the Prime Minister is the head of government. Our Head of State is indeed Queen Elizabeth, Queen of Canada.

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          • Ummm I think you need to do some reading kiddo. Queen Elizabeth is the Head of State of Canada along with 12 other countries. I think you should give it a read and do some more research. We became completely independent from British rule with the Canada Act, 1982. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canada_Act_1982, and independence as a self governing entity on July 1, 1867; hence Canada Day. https://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/canadian-independence-day But she is still our head of state. I quote “The head of state in Canada is the sovereign or Queen of Canada, currently, Queen Elizabeth II. Before her, the Canadian head of state was her father, King George VI. The Queen’s powers as head of state are exercised by the Governor General of Canada except when the Queen is in Canada. The governor general, like the sovereign or Queen, remains outside of politics as the role of head of state in Canada is largely ceremonial. Governors general and lieutenant governors are considered representatives of, and therefore subordinate to, the head of state as opposed to the head of government, or the Canadian prime minister.” Seems you were not a very good history student, eh? and by the way, I AM CANADIAN…and I have my facts straight…to you? I think you better learn a bit more before you make that statement again.

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          • You are quite incorrect but well intentioned. In Canada our Head of Government is the PM. It our Head of State is the Queen and when not in Canada she is represented by the Governor General. No Bill becomes law without it first being signed by the Queen or GG (“Royal Assent”). The Queen is not just the Queen of England, her full title and the one used while in Canada includes Queen of Canada.

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          • Janie – When a Canadian is arrested and goes to court the prosecutors represent The Crown. Crown prosecutors enforce the law of the land, and criminal court cases are always titled something like HRM vs Smith (where HRM stands for Her Royal Majesty). We have a Queen.

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        • To Jean Richard Pelland: The Americans have a dictionary of their own….. what we Canadians spell ending in ours they spell ors..(valour)..words ending in tre they spell ter (theatre) kilometre/kilometer….. and so on…… that is not what makes a lot of them ignorants/ignoramus …it’s a different way of spelling what means the same thing……. like a mile is 5,280 feet and a kilometre is 3,280.8399 feet…..

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          • That’s so bogus. Only millipedes have more than 4 feet. Except ants.🐜
            And spiders
            That’s why we went metric. A government inquiry found that nothing had more than 8 feet, except millipedes. So there was no way a mile could have like 5,000 of them. That’s just silly

            ….oh, and my ant Doris only has 2 feet

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    • Technically yes but like her rule over UK parliament she NEVER uses it. And considering we are deemed a safer and more decomratic country then the US please explain how you see it as a police state.

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        • Canadian here. I pay for my meds bigly. Averages 250.00 per month. I do not pay to go to the doctor or the hospital when needed. I do pay for the ambulance that takes me there. Canadian health care is not “free”. We pay high taxes

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          • As an American I pay almost the same in taxes plus way more if I had health care and that wouldn’t cover all the co-pays and meds. I put my income into your tax system and the us tax system and I would take your Canadian way any day.

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              • The highest Canadian federal marginal tax rate is 33%. That means that if you make over $202,800 you’re taxed at 33% on the amount you make over and above $202,800. Income you have that’s less than that is taxed at successively lower rates. At $45,916 a year you only pay 15% in income taxes. So, no, we do not pay 50% of our income in taxes, even if you add sales tax.

                And having lived on both sides of the US/Canada border, I will take our heathcare system any day of the week. It’s not perfect, but it means I can actually see a doctor when I need to without paying hundreds of dollars.

                Liked by 1 person

                • You forgot to add provincial income taxes. And if from Quebec, add Quebec pension and parental leave programs, you’ll hit your 50%, I see it every two weeks of my pay stub…

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                  • And that’s why in Quebec everyone can afford schooling, from kindergarden to university. Mothers don’t have to leave their babies to strangers at 12 weeks to go back to work. Fathers can spend time with their babies and help the mom. We have a yearly franchise on most and essential medications so we don’t go bankrupt. Elderlies have (somewhat) decent living conditions (Forget the CHSLD tho). But the roads are terrible 😦

                    What a shame we are, right?

                    Liked by 1 person

                    • Quebec can afford all those goodies (no other Canadian province can) simply because they get $14 billion a year as a subsidy
                      as it is a :have not” province.

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                    • And once Again with the Québec bashing. You ppl never get tired, do you? We make choices as a dinctinct society to orovide for a social net for our citizen, your solution is to level everything to the lowest value. Keep on going, then wonder why we talk about divorce for incompatible personality, then ROC can come crying again, like in 1995 that “you looooove us so much, dont go away…”

                      Nb : we can “afford” these “things” because of higher taxes, national lottery, hydro and liquor stores bringing in revenues. We make those choices. The perequation we receive is in accordance with our democratic weight. Sink that in.

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    • You know nothing about Canada, do you? The Queen is a figurehead, plain and simple, and has no say in what the Canadian Government does, or can change any of its laws. Prove me wrong, or STFU.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Think again stupid!! Research your answer before you open your yap!! I hate when people don’t research things first!! The head of state in Canada is the sovereign or Queen of Canada, currently, Queen Elizabeth II. Before her, the Canadian head of state was her father, King George VI. The Queen’s powers as head of state are exercised by the Governor General of Canada except when the Queen is in Canada. The governor general, like the sovereign or Queen, remains outside of politics as the role of head of state in Canada is largely ceremonial. The Canadian head of state (Queen Elizabeth II) does, however, hold constitutional powers known as emergency “reserve powers,” which separate the head of state and the head of government to ensure the proper functioning of Canada’s parliamentary government. In practice, these powers are very rarely exercised.

        Governors general and lieutenant governors are considered representatives of, and therefore subordinate to, the head of state as opposed to the head of government, or the Canadian prime minister. https://www.thoughtco.com/head-of-state-510594

        there….now you can STFU!!

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    • People like you obviously have no concept of how anything works. First, the queen doesn’t even control her own country let alone all the others that fall under the UK banner. Second, you’re trying to justify how awful the US is by attempting to denigrate a country that all polls show is superior to the US. Your words help prove it!

      Liked by 1 person

    • Actually jackass, our head of state is the Governor-General not the Queen of England. Also our police don’t shoot people in the back and are really quite nice.

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      • If you want to be technically correct to a Russian troll bot (because Frink is obviously one) the head of state is not the GG. The head of state is the Queen of Canada, who also happens to be QE2, Queen of UK and Northern Ireland. Her appointed representative in Canada is the GG, who acts as de facto head of state in her absence.

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      • Not quite. The Queen(of Canada) IS the Head of State. The GG is her representative. In reality, the GG is the head of state, but not everything is written down. There are emergency powers but rarely used – see the Byng King crisis 1926.

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      • hahaha seems the joke is on you jackass!! the Queen is Canada’s Head of State. The Governor General is an advisor of/to the Queen.

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      • Actually, the joke is on you jackass!! The Queen is Canada’s Head of State. The Governor General consults to the Queen (and her advisors) and hosts the Royal Family while they are in Canada, and the Prime Minister is the Head of Government. Wow….some Canadians still don’t know our history and how it has changed!! Try reading the BNA Act of 1867 and the Canada Act of 1982. Try with something easy, like this though https://www.thoughtco.com/head-of-state-510594 It will fill you in on what each role is….lol

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    • Yeah…no. our cops only care about violent crimes. Mostly their job entails giving directions to tourists, containing people off their crazy pills, ticketing speeders, and shooting half dead animals we run over.

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      • I just wish the remarks about guns was really true. The number of shooting s in Toronto each week shows we are fast catching up to the USA.

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      • ummm yeah, she is still Head of State of Canada, although she has very limited power now, since the Canada Act of 1982. Our PM is Head of Government. Our Governor General is either approved or not by the Queen. We don’t elect the GG here. The PM sends his recommendation for GG and she can say yes or no to the person the PM chooses but rarely interferes with the PM’s decision. So, technically, the Governor General is the Prime Ministers boss and the Queen is the Governor Generals boss!! I am so surprised that more Canadians don’t know this…or are these younger Canadians that don’t know our history well anymore!!! And it seems you are the dumbass for not knowing this!!! Here…have a quick read, this will fill you in a bit…hahaha

        https://www.thoughtco.com/head-of-state-510594

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    • Oh God. I miss you guys. Living in Calgary was a wonderful experience. Living in Calgary now, would be nice too as we hit a 100 degree F heat wave. Living in Calgary now would be really nice too as we have an ignorant asshole as a leader and a bunch of scared white folks who don’t get it. Again, I miss you guys!

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      • omg…you are so right….I have been reading over some of these comments and I am in shock!! Are these people under 30 or 40 that are making these stupid comments about the Queen’s relation to Canada!! And at least one didn’t know what the Canada 150 was meant for!! I am flabbergasted!!! This has put my OCD about being a Proud Canadian in overdrive!!! hahaha Obviously Canada’s history seems to have been less important to the younger groups than to my generation, which is only the next one above these morons….sad really. I was in school from 1974 in grade school….in which we sang God Save the Queen, (O Canada was not proclaimed as national anthem until July 1, 1980 with God save the Queen remaining our Royal Anthem.) said morning prayers and all that other stuff schools now see as offensive or not belonging in our schools. We learned about all these acts, the significance of them. I’m only 53, but that makes me feel so old and very sad these people have no real clue about our history. 😦

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    • Ha Ha Ha Ha Ha! Obviously either doe not know what a police state really is, or does not know Canada at all. Notice, he lacks the courage to sign his real name – must be really have a great fear of Canada’s Thought Police! 😉

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    • Hahahahaha!!! Oh shoot. I laughed too loud and the cops are at my door. (Police state 😂😂😂 good one)

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    • Haha. What do you know! I work for the national police here and freely admit they can’t get their shi% together to rule over an iceberg. Try again, #LOL

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    • She technically also the Queen of Canada. We both have the same rule for succession, the next King should be the same. Canada or the U.K. could change that law without affecting they other one law.

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    • Yes, you are right, the Queen is the “official”head of state of Canada. Just like that other well known terrorist country – Australia.

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    • Ya not fucking likely. You just go ahead and worrie that your not going to make it past the next roadside police stop. Or imprisoned for collecting rain at forced to tear up your garden because that fat whore across the street shoving ding dongs in her mouth finds your healthy eating offensive

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    • You are a moron, I have lived in the u.s. for 35 years served in the military and raised a couple children and have lived in Canada for 17 years so I know how it really is in the states and canada. Only an American who has never been outside of the states will try to convince you it’s the best place to live or try to convince you that universal health care is bad. Let’s look at that I myself know people who actually think they are better off without it. The reason they believe that is because they have been lied to by u.s. government and representatives so they could get paid off by insurance companies. So many more lies and false statements but your police state remark about Canada is laughable. I have never been approached by police here but in Mississippi and other states I have been harassed had my car searched and just generally bullied by the police. So my suggestion to you professor fink another laugh is to travel outside of your bubble so you don’t appear as unknowledgeable and untraveled. IGNORANT!!!!!!!!

      Liked by 2 people

  1. I was told we’d cruise the sea for American gold. We’d fire no guns and shed no tears, but I’m a broken man on a Halifax pier; the lady of Barratt’s privateers!

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    • Have a read through bill c75 and bill c71 and get back to us. For $3.8 billion we could give safe drinking water to all the First Nations Reserves, but some how we are on the hook for $4.8 billion to buy out an American intrest in a risky perhaps illegal oil pipeline. Selling off what should be a profitable public utility (hydro one) so private corporate profiteers can score million dollar payouts leaving consumers with skyrocketing bills. Tell us again how Canada is doing it right?

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      • Lets not forget all the homeless people, high taxes, gas, utilities I could go on forever but I won’t.
        Watching our hard made dollar get taxed to death.
        Rant over

        Like

      • It’s certainly not perfect, but in my opinion and the opinions of most of my friends, including some people who came from there it’s a way better and safer place to live than the USA.
        You can troll on the bad stuff, but there is a lot about Canada and living here that really rocks.

        Liked by 2 people

        • Interesting points made by many, about how our (Canada) country or the USA is better. Like many ill-defined terms, “better” is difficult to nail down because there are so, so many variables. “Security threat to the US” is much easier to nail down and we are a decisive “not” in that category, at least not since the Treaty of Ghent in 1814 (and the Brits burned the White House, not the militias from Upper Canada).
          Paul Duncan – no relation, that I know of – put a positive and satirical spin on a negative decision by someone with credibility issues. And that’s describing those issues and that man in a stereotypically polite, Canadian way.

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          • Why is it that extremists of any persuasion feel the need to insult people, and call them names when all that is really required is polite discourse and the civil exchange of ideas. It is perfectly OK for people to disagree without lowering the tone of the discussion.

            Like

  2. THANK YOU! A great laugh. I’ve sent it to friends around the world who LOVE Canada. I LOVE Canada, I’m so lucky I was born here (one of my parents was an immigrant from England).

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Reblogged this on Robby Robin's Journey and commented:
    A fun satirical piece explaining why Donald Trump has labelled Canada a threat to US national security (and hence imposing punishing and self-defeating trade tariffs on us and other “friends”). We’re a pretty scary country, especially if you’re afraid of cold weather. Worth a reblog. Enjoy!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Very cute satire. As with most it is based on facts. As with many, it is also takes liberty with the truth. Your Prime Minister has been just as fanciful with pushing his political agenda, has been repeatedly overruled by the Canadian courts, has been unwilling to compromise on numerous issues, especially trade, abandoned most Western nations in his implicit support of Syria as Chair of the UN Council of Disarmament. Canada has been a friend to the United States for a long, long time. Friends can have disagreements and remain friends. I appreciate your attempt to use humor to highlight this area of difference, but there is also some truth in the position of the United States and the lack of compromise from your goverment.

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    • By “lack of compromise” I can assume you actually mean “not selling out our country to the Americans for a song” right? Am I supposed to support that?

      Like

    • In Canada, we call that democracy. We’re allowed to make mistakes and try again as long as our intentions are honorable. I love Canada 🇨🇦 except for one major issue and that is how the federal government has been treating the Indigenous Peoples of this part of the world for the past 150 years. Renegotiate the treaties and then HONOUR THEM!

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          • Hmmm no I won’t . We’vew given them money, but killed them, taken their land, stolen their chidren, decimated their culture, forbidden their way to live. They still live in reserves, with conditions equal to third word countries.

            But of course, it’s all about money, ain’t it?

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  5. Now in my 70’s and having travelled extensively throughout the world I can honestly say that Canadians are the world’s most polite, intelligent, well spoken folks I have ever come across. Heck they even speak English a darn sight better than most of England’s population. Wonderful people.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Fuck you trump! Your just mad because you set tariffs costing Canadians jobs. The Canadian government did the right job.

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  7. As long as Canada continuescto let returning isis terrorists in and envetted “refugees” we are indeed a security threat to the US, we have one of the longest borders and one that has a lot of places to cross unseen, it is only a matter of time before something happenscin the US that will originate here.

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  8. Dear Canada: my apologies-along with millions of other Yanks-that ‘Merikkka has a semi-senile orange idiot as POTUS. We will be rid of him eventually. Bear with us until then, please. Thank-you…

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  9. We need to send all of our Seniors to Florida and force the Government there to hold a vote on whether it should remain a part of the US, or become part of Canada. With an overwhelming majority, the State of Florida will vote to become the Province of Florida. We get Cape Canaveral, Disney World, the Orange Bowl, etc. We will deport all the criminals to Texas. They won’t notice.

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  10. Last year Arras, France was invaded by 14,000 Canadian students and Cadets – and were appallingly polite and respectful. And they were researching their WW1 heritage. What were they really up to? Probably planning to come back each year to invade, lay wreaths and buy things in the shops. How very dare they! LOL

    Liked by 1 person

  11. too funny, well the first thing Justin did as PM was with draw from the fight against ISIL and letting their fighters back into Canada, but putting that aside people Canada walked away last week from NAFTA talks, this is the result and I am sure nothing makes JT happier then adding 6.5billion $$ tax..oops I mean Tariff on Canadians cost of living all in the name of standing up to Trump. again everyday Canadian have to bare the burden of JT’s bad decisions

    Like

    • was just in ME withdrawing is the best course of action if we stayed we would be between turkey (fighting kurds at the border ) and russia and Iran (helping assad gas more people) or saudi us helping spread its feudal system (king saudi and its sunni empire) there is no real viable side to take

      as for causes of tariffs look to that deranged orange head that is asking for allies in his demented reality tv campaign

      Like

    • He didn’t walk away. He was given a last minute ultimatum on a non-negotiable item (5-year expiry) and did the only thing he could in that situation. Trump needs to withdraw the ultimatum for negotiations to continue.

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  12. Way too much criminal activity going on in these pics. We should all move to the US where the president is in full control of his faculties, the police negotiate and de-escalate dangerous situations, the drug companies charge fair prices and the banks are corruption and scam free, the military only take on peacekeeping duties and the politicians vote for the best interests of the people. So sad we can’t compete with them fairly.

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  13. Je suis né en Nouvelle-France (Detroit). J’ai l’intention d’assister aux Fêtes de la Nouvelle-France au Québec cette année. Je dois être une menace réelle pour la sécurité américaine! Pourrais-je être déporté au Québec ou, mieux encore, en France ????

    [I was born in New France (Detroit). I plan on attending the Fêtes de la Nouvelle-France in Quebec this year. I must be a real threat to US Security! Could I please be deported to Quebec or, better yet, France????]

    Like

    • I agree. The Queen would have none of this, nor would our Head of Government, in all likelihood. The petty rivalry over spelling, poorly researched arguments and hastily written jabs directly undermine the exact point of this article. The world needs more Canada but not like this.

      Like

  14. why are we not talking about the real threat here…the CBC! No, I am not talking about your Complete Blood Count….I am talking the National Broadcaster that many deem as an innocent and unbiased medium serving all Canadians. But is that what it really is, or is there something more sinister and dark than what they seem to portray? Darker maybe than the TimmyHo dark roast…which really is not that dark when you actually taste it, and kind of leaves you feeling slightly embarrassed and cheap because deep down you know that real dark roast coffee does not come from a place that serves something called TimBIts. In any case, back to the matter at hand, the CBC…also stands for ‘Canada’s Bitter Cold! Sure, it seems so democratic, so cerebral, educated and dignified, but yet could this be a front to gain access into other countries to conduct espionage (wait is that how u spell espionage?). Or is it espisito? In any case, it seems that the CBC, whom always talks about running its services on a shoestring budget, still seems to be everywhere…and I mean EVERYWHERE! They are like CNN but way easier to approach and chat with. In fact, if both networks were therapists you were seeing, you would choose to see the CBC to help with your problems since it would not lie to you and ridicule you for mispeling the word ‘touque’ or is it ‘toque’? CNN is really Hannibul Lechter…a master manipulator, whereas the CBC is more like Floyd Robertson in Khaki’s paddling a canoe. But even though the CBC is a better shrink, this just means it is even more skilled at gaining access into foreign governments, financial institutions and various curling events anywhere on the planet. CNN ends up eating someone at some point on the trip. But don’t let the paddling Floyd lull you into comforting thoughts my fellow Canucks (no reference to the hockey team because no one cares about Vancouver sport teams…unless of course you have moved there recently and are so poor and in debt that you have lost touch with reality and fall for cute whale on the jersey)…where was i? – RIght….Floyd Robertson is a spy, and so is Mansbridge for that matter. So be careful Canada, the CBC is watching and listening to you, and more importantly, they are watching others and are a hidden threat to the security of other nations…one Canadian Air Farce and bonspiel at a time!

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  15. As an American (though I must cast my eyes downward in embarrassment as I acknowledge it… yes, I am one), I find these comments entertaining. Image, Canadians arguing with each other in a difference of opinion about the Queen. That’s so aggressive, so confrontational, so inflammatory… so unCanadian. It’s alarming to those of us living south of the border to think Canadians could display such extraordinary fervor about anything other than hockey or poutine. Clearly you are a dangerous people and we should begin immediately to build a wall! And we should make Canada pay for it by donating all the steel (or we’ll accept maple syrup if you don’t have any steel).

    Don’t get me wrong. I LOVE Canada. Some of my best friends are Canadian… although I’m not sure I’d want my daughter to marry one.

    It’s just my radical neighbors who fear you. But I’m sure the U.S. and Canada can patch things up once you get rid of your nuclear bombs.

    Like

  16. As an American (though I must cast my eyes downward in embarrassment as I acknowledge it… yes, I am one), I find these comments entertaining. Imagine, Canadians arguing with each other in a difference of opinion about the Queen. That’s so aggressive, so confrontational, so inflammatory… so unCanadian. It’s alarming to those of us living south of the border to think Canadians could display such extraordinary fervor about anything other than hockey or poutine. Clearly you are a dangerous people and we should begin immediately to build a wall! And we should make Canada pay for it by donating all the steel (or we’ll accept maple syrup if you don’t have any steel).

    Don’t get me wrong. I LOVE Canada. Some of my best friends are Canadian… although I’m not sure I’d want my daughter to marry one.

    It’s just my radical neighbors who fear you. But I’m sure the U.S. and Canada can patch things up once you get rid of your nuclear bombs.

    Like

  17. But the article doesn’t mention the attacks on the beaches with dangerous needles and glass in muskoka to wreak havoc on tourism. Look it up.

    Like

  18. Thank you for this for this warning! My wife and I have planned on moving to Nanaimo (and living on Nanaimo Bars) after we retired, but Canada’s very strict immigration law prevented this from happening. So, here we are, stuck in Wichita, KS, in the home of Trump and the land of Pence. (Question: If “con” is the opposite of “pro” is “congress” the opposite of “progress”?)

    Like

    • Anywhere but Nanaimo. Do you know what’s in a nanaimo bar? Hell’s Angels and hookers. Yes it’s a joke. Sort of. Stay south of Cowichan or north of Nanoose and you’ll fit right in.
      I’m not sure about any strict immigration law that would prevent you from coming but if so, just claim being an ex-terrorist trying to reform and you’ll be in. Or, you can just walk across at some obscure crossing like many already have and the Mounties will actually help you with your bags.

      Like

  19. For what it’s worth, 60 % of “those people”, as you refer to them – Francophone Québécois – voted for independence in 1995. The “No” vote prevailed by a tiny margin (50.58% to 49.42%) essentially because of the Anglophone minority. (Also: a lot of illegal campaign funding, but let’s not get into that…)

    Like

  20. Being a security threat to the US is the sexiest false news anyone has made up about Canada in a long time. Way to go, Canada! It’s tough being a civilized society and we need all the help we can get to change our public image.

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  21. I’ll bet that Justin Trudeau is just sitting with his legs crossed, hands on his hips, and glaring…LOL… Here are the facts on this…The President never said, “Canada is a security threat”. The PRESS is saying that. What President Trump actually said was, if the U.S. protected and expanded our own metal industries it will “enhance our national security”, which is absolutely true. This is another example of how the media is mangling context and misreporting facts. The President is setting the bar for negotiations. Trade policies with our neighbors and allies have been lopsided for decades. NAFTA even made it worse. I give the President credit for bringing this to the table to be renegotiated. It was necessary.

    Like

    • You tell me how trade with Canada is lop sided? We buy more goods and services from the United States than you buy from us. Dairy was never part of NAFTA, and you are still winning!

      You’re going to pay all those juicy tariffs (taxes on Americans). Trump needs to find a way to make up for the tax breaks and this is his answer! 25% here and there and presto, the books are balanced! Pro tariff supporters are all mouth until they start noticing the cost of goods in stores on the rise. No big deal of course until it’s something you need, right? And you’re going to smile and say, ‘hear you go President Trump, 25% extra out of my pocket for you! Just doing my part President Trump, you go get those bad countries and make them pay (or umm me pay)’.

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  22. Canada is not a security threat, Russia is. Trump is a twisted monster to say that Canada is when it isn’t, FU TRUMP! Congrats California on their wins last night keep on going bring on that BLUE WAVE, best wishes from Canada we’re behind you USA, you got this!

    Like

    • Trump said that a dead steel and aluminum industry in his country could pose a security threat. Kind of lame but not the same as saying Canada poses a security threat. But Trudeau chose to play it that way for his groupies.
      Trump has good reason to think of the drama teacher as a drama queen.

      Like

  23. I didn’t realize this whole topic was about the queen. I thought it was about how how Trump thinks we are a security threat.

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    • with a number of you being canoodian, let me clear up this horrible misunderstanding. what speaketh the donald has no bearing on why anything is done here….. here’s the scoop:

      american billionaires and business people were sad. they wanted a tax cut. they got a tax cut. they are happier now. with me so far? good.

      but america spends money like a sailor on a three day pass, so everyone will love us, or at least put up with us. so we need lots of money. but we don’t want billionaire’s money, cause sad billionaires can’t buy politicians here. and politicians are expensive.
      we have lots of rich people, and their job is to buy the politicians, ’cause only they can afford them.

      so, we need money, and we just cut our national income. so….. we will put tariffs (spiffy word for tax) on every raw material we import that isn’t oil, of course. this way, trumps base* (word for dumb mofo’s who thought charlie sheen screaming “winning” meant he was) can feel that they too are winning.

      this way, the dumb chucklebunnies who elected trump, not the russians who helped, but the single wide trailer trash
      who think he represents them, can go to walmart and pay extra for everything that has aluminum in it. and do their part to MAGA.

      if any of this makes sense, please, get professional help. i’ve clarified this as best i can. my work here is done.

      Like

  24. Trump said that a dead steel and aluminum industry in his country could pose a security threat. Kind of lame but not the same as saying Canada poses a security threat. But Trudeau chose to play it that way for his groupies.
    Trump has good reason to think of the drama teacher as a drama queen.

    Like

  25. Now THAT’S the kind of satire I enjoy!! Somebody/somebodies are VERY good at this kind of writing and are SO KIND to share with the rest of us…….

    Liked by 1 person

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